LANDROVING IN KZN

February 2006

THE LAND ROVER OWNERS CLUB OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
KWAZULU NATAL

 17th Annual General Meeting

Date               : 25 February 2006
Time               : 15h30 for 16h00
Venue            : Eston Farmers Club -   Eston

The AGM weekend will take the form of a camp over weekend. For the non campers Eston is close to PMB or Durban to attend as a day event. The plan for the weekend is as follows :

·       Camping is available from Friday afternoon, 24 Feb .
Saturday 25 Feb :   10h00 1st Gates Event for 2006 in the quarry above the Club.
Saturday 25 Feb : 15h30 for 16h00. The 17th AGM of the LROC KZN in the Eston Farmers Club House.

 Saturday after the AGM a LROC sponsored braai for the members who have booked with Henry Cochrane on the lawn in front of the club house. Cut off date for booking for the braai is Sunday 19 February 2006. Contact no’s for Henry to the left under Committee.

Sunday 26 Feb :  09h30. A scenic valley trail drive from the Eston Club through the surrounding farms. A byo braai for lunch along the trail. Trail grade 1 – 2 (3).

NOTE :

·       The Eston Farmers Club has offered the LROC the use of the facilities for free providing that we support the Club. The Club has a full bar and kitchen and all meals can be arranged at a very reasonable cost from the Eston Club. Please do not bring along your braai’s to braai on the Clubs premises.

 ·      The Clubs sports field ablutions will be available for the campers.

       ·    Camping is free for those who support the Eston Farmers Club.

       ·     It’s your Club and now is the time to complain or contribute to the success of the LROC KZN.


WELCOME TO THE FOLLOWING NEW MEMBERS 

Remember it’s your club and you will get out of it what you want to. You have purchased THE BEST 4 x 4 x FAR and now its time to use it. See you at the next club event. 

Terrence and Lynette Labuscagne                       Mt Edgecombe                          Disco 3 TD
Wayne Lambert                                                 New Germany                            Defender 90 V8
Peter and Jane Zietsman                                    Kloof                                         Defender 110 TD5 CSW
Gavin and Sue McKenzie                                    Westville                                   Defender 90 Tdi and Disco V8
Geoff and Meg Sperring                                      Kloof                                         Defender 110 TD5 CSW


LROC Club Dates For Your Diary

When

What, where

More Info.

Grade

25 / 26 Feb

LROC KZN         17th AGM

17th LROC AGM.  Eston Farmers Club is the venue. It will be a camp over weekend with a trail, gates event and a braai after the AGM, sponsored by the LROC. Much more info in the newsletter. Contact Henry to book for the braai.

1 - 5

26 March

Day Trip

4x4 Track at High Stakes, Cato Ridge.  We will take the day as an informal driver training day. Attempt the various obstacles with the help of other experienced members.  More info to follow.

1 - 5

27 April – 1 May

Long Weekend Camping trip

Jozini Dam. Tiger fishing for the interested, drives around the area for the rest. More info to follow. Booking for the weekend  is essential. Give Henry or George a call if interested. More info to follow

1- 2

21 May

Cars in the Park – PMB    

Its Cars in the  Park – PMB again. We need the old Land Rovers, the odd ones, the modified, the standard, and the new, in fact we need then all.

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAIL GRADING All our events from now on will have a Trail Grading according to the 5 grades below. 

1.        Complete novice soft dirt road trail, no low range required. Suitable for all Land Rovers including the Freelander.

2.       Limited low range required but suitable for the novice driver. Suitable for all Land Rovers with certain trails not suitable for the Freelander.

3.       Low range and limited off road knowledge required. Suitable for all Land Rovers except the Freelander.

4.       A low range technical trail suitable for the experienced. The inexperienced will be able to do the trail, as assistance will be available from the more experienced members. Suitable for all Land Rovers except the Freelander.

5.       Extremely technical, suitable for the experienced only with the possibility of vehicle damage. Only suitable for "Series" Land Rovers.  Ha Ha


It’s AGM time again and now is the time to have your say in the running of the LROC KZN. The date is 25 February, the place is the Eston Farmers Club. Please all make an effort to attend. Contact a committee member for more info.


The Lesotho Trip. Christmas 2005                                            By Selwyn Ambler

I dithered a bit about going one of the reasons being that I was apprehensive that my old 1970 Series Landy would – yes I must be honest with myself now – let me down. As it turned out I need not have worried but I’m running ahead of the story.

Strict instructions from George were that the convoy was to meet at the Underberg Spar at 8.30am for 9 on the 27/12/2005.  So I left Pinetown at 4.30am reasoning that I would not push my old Landy too hard. I was surprised when I reached Underberg  before 7.30am over an hour ahead of the deadline. I took the opportunity to have a good breakfast at Mike’s just across the way. By then the others had started to arrive and soon with 16 vehicles the Spar’s parking area was looking like a second-hand car lot for Landies. George’s Landy had developed what looked like a serious oil leak but intrepid as he is he went off to look for some spare engine oil and he would just top up the engine as often as necessary. It would have been a serious loss to the convoy had George found it impossible to continue.

We eventually left Underberg at about 9.30 but within a few Ks we had to stop as Don felt that the prop shaft on his Landy was packing up. But once he had tightened his wheel nuts the vibration went away and we were able to continue.

We topped up at Matatiele met up with a 17th Landy and we were off again. The convoy comprised a good representation of Landy models from Range Rovers, Discos, TD5s LWB and Shorties , Tdi 110s and 90s and a pair of Series Models.

Getting  30 odd people through the South African border was tedious and slow and I shuddered to think just how the Lesotho bunch was going to manage.

At last we started up Ongeluks Pass. George had told me that this pass was not as steep as Sani so I was not prepared for just how rough this track is, for it is definitely just a track. Nothing but four-wheel drive vehicles could climb this “road”. Believe me at 8k long it is every bit as steep as Sani. It’s hard to say just how long it took us to climb this pass because a 17 vehicle convoy demands many stops, besides we wanted to take some photos too. But by late afternoon we had “outspanned” at the first overnight stop next to a lake. Cold beers circulated as camps were set up and all of a sudden as the sun dipped behind the mountains the temperature, which one hour prior had some of us wandering about shirtless, plummeted and out came the track suits anoraks and beanies. Fires were lit, suppers cooked but it did not take long before we realised it had been a long day, and we all turned in.

The days on these camping trips seem to start early and we were packed and on our way again by 8.30am. On to the Lesotho Border post, which despite assurances by Pretoria to George to the contrary, was deserted. So we just drove through and our second day had begun in earnest. I’m not too sure of the names of the spots we stopped at and I’m even less sure how George ever found these spots in the first instance. I also ask to be forgiven if my description of the sequence of events is a bit confused but our journey to the second overnight stop was long though very scenic.  We all took many photos and George somehow produced a laptop computer nog al, down loaded all our pics and we had a slide show each evening.

This camping spot was right on the banks of the Senque River (I think its called).  I took the opportunity to have a swim. Being a good 900mts lower in altitude, the night time temperature here was a great deal warmer than the previous evening. 

Again the next morning we were up and on our way early. Whilst on the dirt track and waiting for the convoy to close up, we allowed a 4 ton Toyota truck to pass us and go on ahead. This was a four wheel drive truck only in that it had double wheels on the rear axle, and one very steep section was simply more than it could manage.

We watched it making dust for a while until George simply could not stand it any longer. He drove on ahead and offered the driver a tow. This was accepted with alacrity although the truck was far bigger than George’s Landy. But with a bellow, that V6 of  George’s lugged that 4 tonner up that hill with no effort at all.

The “crow-flight” distance we travelled were quite short but the routes required to access the camp spot were another story entirely. So try as we might to push things along a bit, a 17 vehicle convoy especially under those circumstances is very slow and we finally stopped at a spot overlooking the gorge where George told us was a beautiful camp spot right at the bottom. Truly I could not see any way down and I rather hoped that George was joshing us a bit.

But I was proved wrong and after George and Fred visited the local chief to obtain permission to cross a mielie patch, we started down a barely discernable path into the gorge.  Only the fact that some of the other Landies had gone down ahead thereby showing that it was possible or I honestly do not think I would believe that our vehicles could do it. I was certainly not looking forward to making the climb back up again. In fact once we all safely settled with camps set up, I had a good many gins to calm my nerves and to stop me from dwelling too much on what faced us on the morrow. This camp site though a bit of a tight squeeze for 17 vehicles was beautiful. Right at the mouth of the gorge with cliffs towering above us. Most of us walked down the gorge and took advantage of the waterfalls to have a very well earned shower. Again temperature was mild and not too many jerseys and jackets were in evidence.

The following morning we had to face the climb out or the gorge that I had been dreading the previous evening. I’m not ashamed to admit that I was very apprehensive watching the various Landies all newer and more capable than mine find that ascent very challenging. But again my lack of confidence in my Landy proved groundless as it sailed up with very little fuss. 

We returned to the spot at which we spent our first night via a dirt track that George seemed to pluck out of nowhere. Honestly I don’t know how he does it but it is uncanny the way he knows his way around. It seems that he can pick the very faintest of game trails through the wilderness seemingly at random, to me at least, and these tracks lead unerringly to where we need to go.

We set up camp again, with at tinge of sadness on my part for this was our last night out in the bush. The weather that had previously been perfect took a turn for the worse and the wind was blowing off the Malutis. The cumulus clouds began to build up over the escarpment, and lightning flashes began to illuminate the sky. Rumours were rife that rain was falling on Ongeluks Pass and George was taking great pleasure in working everybody up with stories of how “interesting” the descent of the Pass would be should it be muddy.

The wind direction changed at about 3am and the rain came down in buckets. Fortunately it only lasted for about an hour so no-body suffered any great inconvenience. So with the Landys carrying winches staggered amongst the convoy and behind the trailers as precaution, we set off for home the next morning wondering how bad the pass would be. As it turned out the rain had missed the pass so our descent was uneventful.  

Once we had got back to Matatiele the convoy started to break up as some guys found it easier to wend their way home via different routes. Only five of the original 17 went into Underberg. Jimmy and Bronwyn were lucky enough to stay on for an extra two days at Cobham while the final four Landys of George, Don, Bob and Dianne and me set our sights on home. As a matter of interest from Pinetown back to Pinetown my Landy recorded 1015 km.

Lesotho’s ruggedness is the main reason for its beauty and the area we visited was not short of beautiful scenery. I had a fabulous five days amongst a good bunch of people all sharing a common interest, and if there was any dissatisfaction about how the trip was conducted I certainly did not hear about it. I take this opportunity to express my heartfelt thanks to George who seemed to be in all spots at once.


Land Rover Owners Club
Dear Members,

Gavin and I would like to thank the club for allowing us to join them on the trip to Lesotho in December as non members and for making us feel so welcome. We enjoyed ourselves immensely. Hats off to George for calmly leading 17 vehicles, two pulling trailers, over the 5 days and getting us all back safely. Needless to say we are now members and look forward to many more happy outings. Keep those stories coming Don.

Regards Sue and Gavin McKenzie


LESOTHO DEC 2005                     By Dave King 

17 vehicles! It seemed as though the majority of members in the club had responded in the affirmative to the offering of a trip to Lesotho to be held between Christmas and New Year. Surely some would drop out, but it was just as well that none did, as it turned out to be a great gathering.

Some members met at the petrol stop before Cato Ridge on the N3 to leave at 06h00, and all of us then gathered at the Spar Car park in Underberg, virtually taking over the whole area. New and old acquaintances were made, and after admiring the underbody anti-rust preparation that George had done to the underside of his vehicle, George set off to buy some more oil as he had developed a serious leak. Subsequent to this, a little topping up was done, and the fault rectified itself! Some people even purchased a few local delicacies such as biltong and sausage. This was to prove to be a ‘gypoing’ experience!

The convoy of vehicles headed for Matatiele (at this stage still not integrated into the Eastern Cape) where tanks were filled, and then headed towards the mountains and the Ongeluksnek Pass border post. The weather was perfect with clear skies and warm temperatures, and once the formalities were completed we headed off up the pass, not really knowing what to expect, except that some excitement could be expected.

Actually, standard Land Rovers are exceptional machines, and the more one puts them to the test, the more one appreciates their prowess and capabilities, with the result that the pass was tamed, and except for the ‘pipe’ crossing which caused a bit of consternation, especially for the two trailers, all was steady plain sailing.

Camping that first night was to be on the shores of the Letséng-la-Letse dam, 2405m, which is in a beautiful ‘Alpine’ like setting, and apart from the myriad of Lesotho cattle and sheep grazing on the high pastures, there were numbers of migrant Yellow billed Storks and ‘flocks’ of Ground Hornbills. Lovely to see! Camp was set up, the ‘short drop’ toilet was erected, and braais were lit. One disturbing event occurred when a young steer was attacked in the lake by a pack of dogs, which by instinct were trying to kill the animal. The day was saved when the owner ran from the hill behind the camp and separated the warring factions. That night the temperature plummeted to 3 deg!

Next day we passed through the ‘unmanned’ border post, and turned left to descend the ‘Maphooaneng’ pass down into some typical stunning Lesotho valleys with villages, majestic sandstone edifices, gorges, cliffs and the Quthing river. It really was a sight to behold, and I am sure enjoyed by all. The dirt roads were not particularly challenging, and the tar road was joined just outside Mount Moorosi, where we all assembled before heading towards Mphaki. The road is now fully tarred through to Qacha’s Nek, or it was as far as we went!

Back onto the dirt at Seforong, and into low range before making an interesting  descent to the shearing shed alongside the Senqu River where camp was erected for night two, 1500m. A lovely little spot, large enough for all the vehicles, and a lot warmer than the previous night, which was later also proved by the temperature of the river water in which many people swam or splashed!

After a leisurely breakfast on the third day, camp was struck, and the ‘shale’ pass was negotiated successfully especially after some previous apprehension. A short drive was made to the stone chip area overlooking the gorge housing the next camp. George had been here before on a previous trip, and because of encounters then with the local populace and their maize plants, decided to do a recce of the camping area while the rest of us admired the imposing scenery. Although the selected camp area was lying fallow, the access had been ploughed, necessitating it having to be crossed. A donation given by members of each vehicle was offered to the chief, Ms Malueng, sic. and  the deal to cross the field was struck. Towering cliffs, gorges, a grassed site and water. What could be better? Access was a little daunting, but well negotiated both inward and outward.  Good use was made of the two waterfalls, and walks around the area were well trodden. The bird life was good, and finished off prior to departure the following day with the close sighting of a pair of Veraux Eagles.

The return journey to the original camp site on the shores of the dam was made the next day, turning off at Mphaki, and heading for the unmanned border post.

Winds, low pressures and rain during the fourth night of camping made the descent of Ongeluksnek pass the next day a cause for concern, and contingency plans were made with vehicles having winches being strategically positioned in relation to the trailered vehicles. All to no avail as the road was dry, and the trip home via Matatiele was as enjoyable as ever with the rolling hills of the Natal midlands, the Berg and farmlands presenting different kaleidoscopes.

With the number of vehicles, things sometimes go wrong, but on road repairs by intrepid mechanics managed to repair leaking water pumps, missing wheel hub caps, split water header tanks and leaking clutch cylinders, to say nothing of the one puncture! George’s oil leak repaired itself, as did the clutch cylinder, so not too much had to be done! One learns every day!

Thanks to George and Henry for a really splendid trip.


Land Rover Owners Club KZN Gates Events 2005

Name

Vehicle

Coil / Leaf

LWB / SWB

Gates 1

Gates 2

Gates 3

Total

Landy Toyota

Dirk Konyn

Series 1

Leaf

SWB

410

540

610

1560

 

George Goswell

Series 111S

Leaf

LWB

410

440

500

1350

110 M

Ryan Goswell

Series 111S

Leaf

LWB

410

430

500

1340

 

Jan Viljoen

Series 111S

Leaf

LWB

0

530

620

1150

240 O

Ron Scafturis

Series 111S

Leaf

LWB

0

420

430

850

430 S

Don Erwin

Range Rover

Coil

LWB

360

0

460

820

 

Mike Laterbach

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

0

440

360

800

260 S

Bob Lemon

Range Rover

Coil

LWB

0

350

440

790

130 S

Dave King

Disco Tdi

Coil

LWB

350

380

0

730

 

Craig de Winnaar

Range Rover

Coil

LWB

0

0

530

530

220 O

Antony de Robillard

Defender 90

Coil

SWB

440

0

0

440

 

Mike Cullen

Series 11A

Leaf

SWB

0

0

410

410

 

Les Williams

Series 11A

Leaf

SWB

0

0

380

380

 

Jimmy Oates

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

370

0

0

370

 

Alfie Shilton

Range Rover

Coil

LWB

370

0

0

370

 

Fred Johnson

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

370

0

0

370

 

Wayne Bolton

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

0

0

350

350

 

Zane van Rensburgh

Dicso V8

Coil

LWB

0

340

0

340

430 S

Kenneth Jones

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

0

0

320

320

 

Richard Cullen

Series 111

Leaf

SWB

260

0

0

260

 

D. Mickleburgh

Series 11A

Leaf

SWB

250

0

0

250

 

Dick Elltringham

Defender 130

Coil

LLWB

230

0

0

230

 

Eugene Le Roux

Range Rover

Coil

LWB

0

200

0

200

 

Selwyn Ambler

Series 111

Leaf

LWB

110

0

0

110

 

C du Toit

Series 11A

Leaf

LWB

0

60

0

60

 

Graham Poulson

Series 111

Leaf

LWB

60

0

0

60

 

Gary van Schoor

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

60

0

0

60

 

Andrew mason

Series 11A

Leaf

LWB

0

40

0

40

 

Paul Chantler

Defender 110

Coil

LWB

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land Rover / Toyota Challenge : O = Highly modified and lockers can be used.  M = Modified without chassis modifications and no lockers.    S = Standard


FOR SALE (shortened due to space constraints this month)
I've got a santana gearbox for sale @ R3000, it is in working condition, as well as a chev 4.1 with weber carb and branches, immaculate condition for R2500.  My contact details are 0836322629, thanks, and cancelleer@hotmail.com. Howling Moon Shower/change Room cubicle, used 3 times. R200  Phone Eric 508 2918(W) 702 6526(H)

 
I have a Garmin Geko 301 with a vehicle mount,pc interface cable,12 volt adapter cable for sale. these items are new, and surplus to my requirements as I have upgraded. R1500-00 is my price.

Gary Clinton 031 561 7586   083 336 9059

DEFENDER 110 CSW 2002 FSH, COLOUR ENVY GREEN IMMACULATE CONDITION , EXTRAS L/RANGE TANK, BULL BAR ,WARN 9000I WINCH , FULL BRAKAH ALUMIUM ROOF RACK AND SPOT LIGHTS,   PRICE R 198,000.00

CONTACT ALLEN CULLEN   0836548567      HOME    031 9161997

For used spares, and vehicle accessories, phone Mike on 082-3720997, or email on mikel@landyspares.co.za  

Last Modified : 09/02/2006 23:06